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Adhesives and Sealants Tutorial - Adhesive and Sealant Options

Typical competitive options for adhesives and sealants are based on epoxy, urethane or silicone polymers.

Epoxy

Epoxy adhesives and sealants will bond to a variety of substrates. They can cure at either room temperature or be accelerated with higher temperatures. General-purpose epoxies have limited utility in long-term, high-temperature service.

Epoxy Formula shown on Electronics circuit
Epoxy Chemical Structure

Urethane

Urethane adhesives and sealants will also bond to a variety of substrates and offer a wide range of flexibility when cured. While their resistance to chemicals, fuels and oils is excellent, they provide only average bond strength to metal without the use of a primer.

Urethane Chemical structure shown on circuit board
Urethane Chemical Structure

Silicone

Silicone adhesives and sealants are often used for their combination of strength, durability and stress relief. Silicone adhesives and sealants from Dow Corning are uniquely stable at high temperatures while remaining flexible at low temperatures. They also offer excellent electrical properties and resistance to weathering.

Silicone chemical structure shown on Electronics circuit
Silicone Chemical Structure

Polyisobutylene (PIB)

Polyisobutylene (PIB) adhesives and sealants can bond to a variety of surfaces and also offer a wide range of flexibility when cured. They have good low temperature performance, but have relatively poor resistance to organic solvents, fuels, oils and chemicals.

Polyisobutylene chemical structure shown on Electronics Circuit
Polyisobutylene Chemical Structure

Acrylic

Acrylic adhesives and sealants bond to a variety of (dry) substrates and are normally cured at room temperature or with heat. Acrylics are typically one of the lowest cost options, but have significant thermal and hydrolytic stability limitations. They are normally used in electronics as Pressure Sensitive Adhesives (PSAs).

Acrylic chemical structure shown on Electronics Circuit
Acrylic Chemical Structure

Cyanoacrylate

Cyanoacrylates ("super glues" bond to a wide variety of surfaces to give a very fast and strong bond. They have limited thermal stability, are brittle, and can leave a white residue on nearby surfaces ("blooming"). Moisture stability of the adhesion to metal can be poor.

Cyanoacrylate chemical structure shown on Electronics Circuit
Cyanoacrylate Chemical Structure

Adhesion
Silicone adhesives and sealants from Dow Corning are designed to adhere to a wide variety of common substrates. Some surfaces, however, do present adhesion problems. For these surfaces, the use of a primer may significantly increase adhesion.

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  1. Adhesives and Sealants Tutorial


  2. You Don't Have To Do It Alone!


  3. Key Characteristics and Properties of Adhesives


  4. Adhesives and Sealants Tutorial - Adhesive and Sealant Options


  5. Importance of Low Modulus versus High Tensile Strength


  6. Adhesives and Sealants Tutorial - Bonding Mechanisms


  7. Adhesives and Sealants Applications


  8. Broad Classes of Dow CorningĀ® Adhesives


  9. Comparison of Product Families


  10. Specialty Adhesives


  11. Basics of Processing Adhesives


  12. Adhesive Curing Methods


  13. Packaging and Storage Considerations


  14. Tell Us What You Need


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